The Cedar Grove Soccer Club (CGSC) is a non-profit organization dedicated to promoting the love of the sport among the youth of Cedar Grove, NJ. We offer development programs and travel teams, depending on the age level and season.

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Top 10 things Refs wish Coaches & Parents knew about the game
05/10/2016
Top 10 things Soccer Referees wish Coaches and Parents knew about...
NEW US Soccer Birth Year Matrix
03/21/2016
CGSC follows US Soccer to determine age grouping. Here is the...
About Us
09/29/2015
The Cedar Grove Soccer Club (CGSC) is a non-profit organization...
I love watching you play.
06/24/2015
Code of Ethics and Sportsmanship
04/01/2014
CODE OF ETHICS AND SPORTSMANSHIP It shall be the goal of Cedar...
 
Top 10 things Refs wish Coaches & Parents knew about the game

Top 10 things Soccer Referees wish Coaches and Parents knew about the game:

 

  1. The ball is out of play when it completely passes over one of the four field borders. In soccer, the entire ball has to be over the line and until it is, the ball is still in play. The player can be off the field completely and as long as the ball is touching one blade of grass with a white marking on it, the ball is still in and can be played by the "out of bounds" player. (FYI, I regularly have parents screaming "The ball touched the line -- it's out!!!!" Do you know how foolish that sounds to someone who knows a bit about the game?)
     
  2. There is no "hand ball" rule. Whenever the ball touches the hand of a player who is not the keeper, the players, coaches, and parents of the other team immediately yell "hand ball" and expect the game to be stopped and the other team awarded the ball. But there is no "hand ball" rule -- a rule that says if the ball touches any part of the "hand" (which is defined as "below the shoulder", BTW) then it's a foul. The actual rule is "DELIBERATELY handling the ball". So when a ball hits a hand/arm, the referee goes through a whole host of mental criteria to determine whether or not he thought the contact was deliberate. If it was, a foul is called. If not, there is no call and the game goes on.
     
  3. Soccer is a contact sport. Many people think soccer is supposed to be a softer version of basketball when it comes to contact. It's actually a much rougher version of basketball and a bit softer than football. Contact is not only allowed, but it's required if a player wants to be successful. The general rule is that shoulder to shoulder contact is fine. Other contact depending on how hard, where it happens, the outcome of it and a few other factors may or may not be ok. The referee is tasked to look at contact and make sure nothing unfair or unsafe happens and call the game accordingly.
     
  4. Just because a player falls down doesn't mean he was fouled. Players fall down (on accident as well as on purpose) all the time in soccer. It's part of the game. It's natural considering you are only using your legs and your opponents are doing the same. And the younger the kids, the more they seem to fall down for no reason whatsoever. So just because Johnny falls down doesn't mean he was fouled and deserves the ball.
     
  5. There's a difference between direct free kicks (DFK) and indirect free kicks (IFK.) An IFK is one in which the kicker cannot score until one additional player (from either team) has touched the ball. If the kicker kicks the ball directly into the net on an IFK, it is not a goal (it comes out for a goal kick for the opposing team). There is no specific signal to indicate a DFK, but if it's an IFK, the referee will raise one arm straight into the air and hold it there until the second player touches the ball or it goes out of bounds. (FYI, a penalty kick occurs when a DFK foul is committed within the penalty area -- the larger of the two boxes around a keeper -- by the defending team.)
     
  6. The referee is sole manager of the clock and adds on time he feels was spent on non-game activities. Games are divided into two halves with designated time periods (both equal). At the start of each half, the referee begins the clock and it keeps running no matter what happens. It never stops. When the required time is reached on the clock, the referee decides how much time was spent on non-game activities like injuries, substitutions, and the like and lets the game go on for that amount of time. This is generally 2 to 3 minutes, but can be longer if there was a bad injury (that took a lot of time to fix) in the half.
     
  7.  A foul isn't always called -- and it's on purpose. In soccer, if a foul occurs, the referee looks for what is called "advantage." If the team that was fouled has the chance of benefiting in some way from the foul or after the foul (like has a chance to move the ball significantly down the field or even score), the referee lets play go on and calls "advantage". Many people don't understand this rule and instead see "mistakes" made by the referee. They usually "see" the following: 1) a foul occurred and the referee "missed it" and 2) then he calls a foul for "nothing." But actually he was simply letting the scene play out to see if the fouled team got an advantage or not.
     
  8. Cards are given for misconduct (things players do that are not allowed). 1) yellow cards are given as warnings that a player did something incorrectly, 2) red cards are given when a player does something so bad that he's thrown out of the game (and his team has to play with one less player), and 3) two yellow cards gets you a red card.
     
  9. Offside is the most confusing concept for spectators, coaches, and players to grasp. The laws applied to offside are too confusing to try and put here in a few words. Suffice to say the Referee and Assistant Referees most probably know the Laws better than you and most certainly are in a better position to determine whether a player was offside at the time the ball was passed in their direction. A player can be in an office position, without any call being made, as long as the ball is passed in their direction.
     
  10. This isn't the world cup. I understand that people get emotionally wrapped into sports, but you have to consider the bigger picture. The kids (especially at the younger ages) are there to have fun and learn a team sport. Don't ruin it for them and everyone else by being a jack wagon.

by posted 05/10/2016
NEW US Soccer Birth Year Matrix

US Soccer Birth Year Matrix

CGSC follows US Soccer to determine age grouping.

Here is the new matrix for determining your player's soccer age.

  1. Look at the 2016-2017 Column
  2. Scroll down to your child's birth year.
  3. That's their Soccer Age. (It may seem 1 year higher than their age now, but remember, this is for the August 2016 - July 2017 soccer year.)
  4. Lastly, specific to our club. We do not have odd number age groups other than U5 and U7. We combine 2 ages together. For example, U10 = U9 + U10. U12 = U11 + U12. U14 = U13 + U14.

Use this chart when registering.

If you have questions, please reach out!
CGSC


by posted 03/21/2016
About Us
The Cedar Grove Soccer Club (CGSC) is a non-profit organization led by dedicated volunteers. Opportunities to become involved with the CGSC are available to those interested.
    The Club was re-established in 2010 with the following goals:
    • Promote soccer in and around the Township of Cedar Grove
    • Develop the best possible soccer programs for Cedar Grove youth
    • Provide instruction in the fundamentals of soccer and the rules of the game
    • Provide game experience for all participants by placing teams in either recreation or travel leagues
  •  

 

Board of Directors:
President - Greg Dilley
Vice President - Joe Tencza
Treasurer - James Posnett
Secretary - Maria Adubato
Registrar - Dave LaSala

 

by posted 09/29/2015
I love watching you play.


by posted 06/24/2015
Code of Ethics and Sportsmanship

CODE OF ETHICS AND SPORTSMANSHIP

It shall be the goal of Cedar Grove Soccer Club to teach, foster and promote the sport of soccer.  It is the intent of this program for the participants to enjoy while working to LEARN and IMPROVE their playing skills in addition to promoting GOOD SPORTSMANSHIP in a competitive environment. Winning must never come at the expense of these fundamental objectives

It is the responsibility of every parent/guardian to strive to instill and promote in my child/children, the meaning of GOOD SPORTSMANSHIP


by posted 04/01/2014